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During thousands of years, human evolution has kept a part of our brain that comes from the early stages of its development. This part, the so called “reptile brain”, still plays an important role in our lives, controlling basic behaviours to ensure survival —sexual drive, search for food, or aggressive response such as the “fight-or-flight” type of reactions.

In reptiles, automated responses to sexual stimuli, to food, or to a potential predator remain programmed as reflect reactions of the brain, just like they have during thousands of years of evolution. In mankind, many experiments have shown that a good part of our behaviour originates in areas buried deep down in our brains, the same areas that long time ago directed the vital activities of our ancestors.

Programmed to React

The impulses and responses from our animal mind have nothing to do with the action and work performed by our human brain. They are purely “instinct”, these are reactions we execute without thinking, analysing or processing, they come from within because they are pre-programmed to trigger in the event of certain cases or situations. In our day to day life, our instinct warns and protects us, allowing a prompt response to detect a dangerous situation, or if we need to eat to avoid starvation. These responses are not the result of a detailed analysis by the brian, but come from the depths of this.

But this mechanism has a negative side, conditioning us to a degree that’s hard to imagine. Just like Carlos Castaneda said, despite that most of us have never starved, we all are anxious if food is lacking, despite that we probably have never lacked the basic things to live, we all dread being left with “nothing”. In our day to day existence this is the cause why we tend to project in our reality a “lack of” something, and as a result for creating a fear of “not having” something, whatever that is, at a very deep level .

Consciously Overriding the Program

One way to avoid creating and attracting the “lack of…” frame of mind and situations is to become aware of the reptile brain routine. The moment we notice, at any level, any anxiety related to “survival”, we can override it recognizing it as useless and senseless. The “program” of the reptile brain may have been useful to our ancestors, but it does more harm than good to us. Recognizing them and canceling them is the first step to freeing us of their power over our subconscious.